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Jaguar Land Rover Fined for Accident and Injury in a Manufacturing Plant

One of Britain´s largest vehicle manufacturers – Jaguar Land Rover – has been fined £900,000 for an accident and injury in a manufacturing plant.

On 8th February 2015, a Range Rover Sport vehicle was driven towards the start of the production line at the Jaguar Land Rover manufacturing plant in Solihull, West Midlands – an event that typically happens forty-eight times an hour during a normal working day.

However, on this occasion, the driver of the vehicle was covering a shift for an unwell employee, and was unfamiliar with the procedures for bringing cars onto the production line. He lost control of the vehicle and drove it into the back of a car he had previously delivered.

The collision resulted in a four-car shunt that trapped a colleague between the second and third cars on the production line. The colleague suffered devastating injuries to his right leg, which was later amputated above the knee. Two other employees were also injured in the accident.

The accident and injury in a manufacturing plant was investigated by officers from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The officers found that Jaguar Land Rover had failed to ensure the driver of the Range Rover Sport vehicle was familiar with the procedures for bringing cars onto the production line, and that workers were not properly separated from the moving vehicles on the production line.

The company was prosecuted for breaches of the Health and Safety at Work Act and for exposing its employees to the risk of injury. The hearing took place at Birmingham Crown Court earlier this week, where judges imposed a £900,000 fine for the accident and injury in a manufacturing plant and ordered Jaguar Land Rover to pay £49,800 costs.  Following the hearing HSE inspector John Glynn said:

“A worker has been left with life changing injuries that were completely avoidable, it was only good fortune that prevented this from being a fatal accident. Jaguar Land Rover knew the risks of driving vehicles onto production lines and the possibility of shunt accidents, but failed to protect their workers.”